Bengal provided him the opportunity for a business of supplying lime and elephants to his bosses in Chowringhee (Calcutta) and Leadenhall Street (London).  Today he is remembered as “a collector of revenue, a maker of roads and bridges, an elephant hunter and shikari, a magistrate, judge, policeman, and doctor in one.”

 

William Makepeace Thackeray, the grandfather of the celebrated writer of the same name, was posted as a collector in the Sylhet district of Bengal. He came to India at the age of seventeen, and by the time he was twenty seven, in 1776, it was already time for him to retire. Thackeray amassed a huge fortune, enough for him to live the rest of his retired married life as an English nabob (a character that is often lampooned in the novels of his grandson), in the three years of administrative service that he spent in Sylhet.

Bengal provided him the opportunity for a business of supplying lime and elephants to his bosses in Chowringhee (Calcutta) and Leadenhall Street (London).  Today he is remembered as “a collector of revenue, a maker of roads and bridges, an elephant hunter and shikari, a magistrate, judge, policeman, and doctor in one.” He was instrumental in the confiscation of the possessions of the descendants of the recalcitrant Raja of Jaintia, owing to their practice of sacrificing British subjects to the Goddess Juinteswari.

 

Coldnoon Bureau

Coldnoon Bureau

Coldnoon (International Journal of Travel Writing & Travelling Cultures) is one of the largest online literary magazines published from Asia. It has published authors from all over the world, largely from India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, Russia, United States, United Kingdom, Denmark, Brazil, Uruguay, Peru, among others.

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