Swimmers are also known to have been rescued by them from sharks in the Gulf of Akaba and the Red Sea. And in 2009, it was the turn of a beluga whale to save Yang Yun, a diver in Harbin, north east China, after she began sinking deep due to her legs being paralyzed by sudden cramps.

 

In April, 2014, British endurance swimmer, Adam Walker, took to the freezing sea to swim between New Zealand’s North and South islands, across the Cook Strait–a distance of 26 kilometers. During his marathon swim he saw a two-meter large shark underneath him. Walker was in the pursuit of being the first British swimmer to complete the Oceans Seven challenge, which comprises the seven of the hardest open water swimming marathons in the world. It was also a part of a bid to raise money for the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society. Before the Cook Strait could be his last swim, a pod of dolphins surrounded Walker, and swam alongside him for an hour–of the gruelling eight-hour and thirty-six-minute swim–until he was ushered into a zone of safety.

Earlier, in 2004, dolphins had saved a group of four swimmers off the New Zealand beach, when a great while shark began trailing them. Other than this, the seas of Australia and New Zealand are rife with legends of dolphins saving humans and cetaceans from possible death by drowning or shark attacks. Although no proper scientific research exists in this regard, dolphins are now unanimously considered altruistic mammals, with a special tendency of altruism towards humans. Swimmers are also known to have been rescued by them from sharks in the Gulf of Akaba and the Red Sea. And in 2009, it was the turn of a beluga whale to save Yang Yun, a diver in Harbin, north east China, after she began sinking deep due to her legs being paralyzed by sudden cramps.

In another incident from 2014, which occurred in the month following Walker’s completion of the Cook Strait, Maddalena Bearzi–ecologist and co-founder of the Ocean Conservation Society–and her team discovered a pod of dolphins who were trying to lead them to a spot about three kilometers offshore, from the beach in Los Angeles, California. It was an eighteen-year-old German girl who had come as a tourist to Los Angeles, but had decided to commit suicide. The girl was finally rescued and hospitalized, where she was later revived from a state of acute hypothermia.

Meanwhile, humans too have been known to repay the favor from time to time to dolphins. Recently, in April 2016, Nick LeBlanc and his girlfriend, Stephanie Paquette, rescued an Atlantic dolphin that had swum ashore and had been stranded n Dartmouth’s Round Hill Beach. A month later, Kayaking instructor Naude Dreyer found a young Benguela dolphin, washed ashore on the Paaltjies Beach in Walvis Bay, Namibia. Dreyer returned the dolphin into the sea where it swum back into the depths it had come from.

 

Coldnoon Bureau

Coldnoon Bureau

Coldnoon (International Journal of Travel Writing & Travelling Cultures) is a refereed, international and interdisciplinary online and print journal that publishes poetry, research papers and nonfiction on the subjects of travel, literary and human geography, psychogeography, and new perspectives on spatiality and travel.

Comments

comments